Glutaric acid

Glutaric acid
Skeletal formula of glutaric acid
Ball-and-stick model of the glutaric acid molecule
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Pentanedioic acid
Other names
Glutaric acid
Propane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid
1,3-Propanedicarboxylic acid
Pentanedioic acid
n-Pyrotartaric acid
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
DrugBank
ECHA InfoCard 100.003.471 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 203-817-2
KEGG
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C5H8O4/c6-4(7)2-1-3-5(8)9/h1-3H2,(H,6,7)(H,8,9) checkY
    Key: JFCQEDHGNNZCLN-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
  • InChI=1/C5H8O4/c6-4(7)2-1-3-5(8)9/h1-3H2,(H,6,7)(H,8,9)
    Key: JFCQEDHGNNZCLN-UHFFFAOYAU
  • C(CC(=O)O)CC(=O)O
Properties
C5H8O4
Molar mass 132.12 g/mol
Melting point 95 to 98 °C (203 to 208 °F; 368 to 371 K)
Boiling point 200 °C (392 °F; 473 K) /20 mmHg
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
checkY verify (what is checkY☒N ?)
Infobox references

Glutaric acid is the organic compound with the formula C3H6(COOH)2. Although the related "linear" dicarboxylic acids adipic and succinic acids are water-soluble only to a few percent at room temperature, the water-solubility of glutaric acid is over 50% (w/w).

Biochemistry

Glutaric acid is naturally produced in the body during the metabolism of some amino acids, including lysine and tryptophan. Defects in this metabolic pathway can lead to a disorder called glutaric aciduria, where toxic byproducts build up and can cause severe encephalopathy.

Production

Glutaric acid can be prepared by the ring-opening of butyrolactone with potassium cyanide to give the mixed potassium carboxylate-nitrile that is hydrolyzed to the diacid. Alternatively hydrolysis, followed by oxidation of dihydropyran gives glutaric acid. It can also be prepared from reacting 1,3-dibromopropane with sodium or potassium cyanide to obtain the dinitrile, followed by hydrolysis.

Uses

Safety

Glutaric acid may cause irritation to the skin and eyes. Acute hazards include the fact that this compound may be harmful by ingestion, inhalation or skin absorption.


This page was last updated at 2023-08-07 06:02 UTC. Update now. View original page.

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