Paradox (theorem prover)

Paradox
Developer(s)
  • Koen Lindström Claessen
  • Niklas Sörensson
Typeautomated theorem proving


Paradox is a finite-domain model finder for pure first-order logic (FOL) with equality developed by Koen Lindström Claessen and Niklas Sörensson at the Chalmers University of Technology.[1][2] It can a participate as part of an automated theorem proving system.[citation needed] The software is primarily written in the Haskell programming language.[3] It is released under the terms of the GNU General Public License and is free.[4]

Features

The Paradox developers described the software as a Mace-style method after the McCune's tool of that name.[5][6] Paradox was developed up to version 4, the final version being effective in model finding for Web Ontology Language OWL2.[7]

Competition

Paradox was a division winner in the annual CADE ATP System Competition, an annual contest for automated theorem proving, in the years 2003 to 2012.[8]

References

  1. ^ "Paradox". Chalmers University of Technology. Archived from the original on 8 January 2007.
  2. ^ Pudlák, Petr (17 July 2007). "Semantic Selection of Premisses for Automated Theorem Proving" (PDF). In Urban, J., Sutcliffe, G., Schulz, S. (eds.). Proceedings of the CADE-21 Workshop on Empirically Successful Automated Reasoning in Large Theories. The 21st International Conference on Automated Deduction. CEUR Workshop Proceedings. 257. Bremen. pp. 27–44. ISSN 1613-0073. Archived (PDF) from the original on 7 November 2011. Retrieved 7 November 2011.CS1 maint: uses editors parameter (link)
  3. ^ "Entrants' System Descriptions". University of Miami. Paradox 3.0. Archived from the original on 7 November 2018. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
  4. ^ "Paradox". Chalmers University of Technology. Archived from the original on 15 January 2007.
  5. ^ Claessen, Koen; Sörensson, Niklas. "New Techniques that Improve MACE-style Finite Model Finding" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 11 November 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2018.
  6. ^ "Automated Theorem Proving" (PDF). Australian National University College of Engineering & Computer Science. pp. 73–74. Archived (PDF) from the original on 11 November 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2018.
  7. ^ Schneider, Michael; Sutcliffe, Geoff (2011). "Reasoning in the OWL 2 Full Ontology Language using First-Order Automated Theorem Proving" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 18 November 2018. Retrieved 11 November 2018.
  8. ^ "The CADE ATP System Competition - The World Championship for Automated Theorem Proving". Previous CASCs' Division Winners. Archived from the original on 1 September 2018. Retrieved 7 November 2018.



This page was last updated at 2019-11-15 00:24 UTC. Update now. View original page.

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