Portal:Morocco

Portal topics
Activities
Culture
Geography
Health
History
Mathematics
Nature
People
Philosophy
Religion
Society
Technology
Random portal

Morocco — المغرب — ⵍⵎⵖⵔⵉⴱ

Shortcut

Morocco (/məˈrɒkoʊ/ ), officially the Kingdom of Morocco, is a country in the Maghreb region of North Africa. It overlooks the Mediterranean Sea to the north and the Atlantic Ocean to the west, and has land borders with Algeria to the east, and the disputed territory of Western Sahara to the south. Morocco also claims the Spanish exclaves of Ceuta, Melilla and Peñón de Vélez de la Gomera, and several small Spanish-controlled islands off its coast. It spans an area of 446,550 km2 (172,410 sq mi) or 712,550 km2 (275,120 sq mi),, while 446,300 km2 (172,300 sq mi) and 710,850 km2 (274,460 sq mi), are of land, and with a population of roughly 37 million Citizens. Its official and predominant religion is Islam, and the official languages are Arabic and Berber (Tamazight); French and the Moroccan dialect of Arabic are also widely spoken. Moroccan identity and culture is a mix of Arab, Berber, African and European cultures. Its capital is Rabat, while its largest city is Casablanca.

The region constituting Morocco has been inhabited since the Paleolithic era over 300,000 years ago, and the first Moroccan state was established by Idris I in 788. It was subsequently ruled by a series of independent dynasties, reaching its zenith as a regional power in the 11th and 12th centuries, under the Almoravid and Almohad dynasties, when it controlled most of the Iberian Peninsula and the Maghreb. Centuries of Arab migration to the Maghreb since the 7th century shifted the demographic scope of Morocco. In the 15th and 16th centuries, Morocco faced external threats to its sovereignty, with Portugal seizing some territory and the Ottoman Empire encroaching from the east. The Marinid and Saadi dynasties otherwise resisted foreign domination, and Morocco was the only North African nation to escape Ottoman dominion. The 'Alawi dynasty, which rules the country to this day, seized power in 1631, and over the next two centuries expanded diplomatic and commercial relations with the Western world. Morocco's strategic location near the mouth of the Mediterranean drew renewed European interest; in 1912, France and Spain divided the country into respective protectorates, reserving an international zone in Tangier. Following intermittent riots and revolts against colonial rule, in 1956, Morocco regained its independence and reunified.

Since independence, Morocco has remained relatively stable. It has the fifth-largest economy in Africa and wields significant influence in both Africa and the Arab world; it is considered a middle power in global affairs and holds membership in the Arab League, the Arab Maghreb Union, the Union for the Mediterranean, and the African Union. Morocco is a unitary semi-constitutional monarchy with an elected parliament. The executive branch is led by the King of Morocco and the prime minister, while legislative power is vested in the two chambers of parliament: the House of Representatives and the House of Councillors. Judicial power rests with the Constitutional Court, which may review the validity of laws, elections, and referendums. The king holds vast executive and legislative powers, especially over the military, foreign policy and religious affairs; he can issue decrees called dahirs, which have the force of law, and can also dissolve the parliament after consulting the prime minister and the president of the constitutional court.

Morocco claims ownership of the non-self-governing territory of Western Sahara, which it has designated its Southern Provinces. In 1975, after Spain agreed to decolonise the territory and cede its control to Morocco and Mauritania, a guerrilla war broke out between those powers and some of the local inhabitants. In 1979, Mauritania relinquished its claim to the area, but the war continued to rage. In 1991, a ceasefire agreement was reached, but the issue of sovereignty remained unresolved. Today, Morocco occupies two-thirds of the territory, and efforts to resolve the dispute have thus far failed to break the political deadlock. (Full article...)

Selected article - show another

The Kasbah Mosque (Arabic: مسجد القصبة, also: Mosque of Yaqub al-Mansūr مسجد يعقوب المنصور الموحدي or Mosque of Moulay al-Yazid) is a historic mosque in Marrakesh, Morocco. It was originally built by the Almohad ruler Yaqub al-Mansur in 1185-1190 CE. It is located in the Kasbah district, the city's former citadel, near the site of its historic royal palaces. Along with the Kutubiyya Mosque, it is one of the most important historic mosques in Marrakesh. (Full article...)
List of selected articles

General images - show another

The following are images from various Morocco-related articles on Wikipedia.

Categories

Moroccan history

Related portals


Religions in Morocco


Arab states


Wikiprojects

WikiProject Morocco

WikiProject Africa

Good article - show another

This is a Good article, an article that meets a core set of high editorial standards.

Central Atlas Tamazight or Atlasic (also known as Tazayit, variant of tashelhit, Middle Atlas Tamazight, Tmazight or Tmazikht, and, rarely, Beraber or Braber; native name: ⵜⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖⵜ Tamazight [tæmæˈzɪxt], [θæmæˈzɪxθ], Arabic: أمازيغية أطلس الأوسط) is a Berber language of the Afroasiatic language family spoken by 2.3 million in the Atlas Mountains of Central Morocco as well as by smaller emigrant communities in France and elsewhere.

Central Atlas Tamazight is one of the most-spoken Berber languages, along with Tachelhit, Kabyle, Riffian, Shawiya and Tuareg. In Morocco, it comes second as the most-spoken after Tachelhit. All five languages may be referred to as "Tamazight", but Central Atlas speakers are the only ones who use the term exclusively. As is typical of Afroasiatic languages, Tamazight has a series of "emphatic consonants" (realized as pharyngealized), uvulars, pharyngeals and lacks the phoneme /p/. Tamazight has a phonemic three-vowel system but also has numerous words without vowels. (Full article...)

Did you know - load new batch

Moroccan cities

Rank City Population
(2014 census)
Region
1 Casablanca 3,359,818 Casablanca-Settat
2 Fez 1,112,072 Fès-Meknès
3 Tangier 947,952 Tanger-Tetouan-Al Hoceima
4 Marrakesh 928,850 Marrakesh-Safi
5 Salé 890,403 Rabat-Salé-Kénitra
6 Meknes 632,079 Fès-Meknès
7 Rabat 577,827 Rabat-Salé-Kénitra
8 Oujda 494,252 Oriental
9 Kenitra 431,282 Rabat-Salé-Kénitra
10 Agadir 421,844 Souss-Massa
11 Tetouan 380,787 Tanger-Tetouan-Al Hoceima
12 Temara 313,510 Rabat-Salé-Kénitra
13 Safi 308,508 Marrakesh-Safi
14 Mohammedia 208,612 Casablanca-Settat
15 Khouribga 196,196 Béni Mellal-Khénifra
16 El Jadida 194,934 Casablanca-Settat
17 Beni Mellal 192,676 Béni Mellal-Khénifra
18 Aït Melloul 171,847 Souss-Massa
19 Nador 161,726 Oriental
20 Dar Bouazza 151,373 Casablanca-Settat
21 Taza 148,456 Fès-Meknès
22 Settat 142,250 Casablanca-Settat
23 Berrechid 136,634 Casablanca-Settat
24 Khemisset 131,542 Rabat-Salé-Kénitra
25 Inezgane 130,333 Souss-Massa
26 Ksar El Kebir 126,617 Tanger-Tetouan-Al Hoceima
27 Larache 125,008 Tanger-Tetouan-Al Hoceima
28 Guelmim 118,318 Guelmim-Oued Noun
29 Khenifra 117,510 Béni Mellal-Khénifra
30 Berkane 109,237 Oriental
31 Taourirt 103,398 Oriental
32 Bouskoura 103,026 Casablanca-Settat
33 Fquih Ben Salah 102,019 Béni Mellal-Khénifra
34 Dcheira El Jihadia 100,336 Souss-Massa
35 Oued Zem 95,267 Béni Mellal-Khénifra
36 El Kelaa Des Sraghna 95,224 Marrakesh-Safi
37 Sidi Slimane 92,989 Rabat-Salé-Kénitra
38 Errachidia 92,374 Drâa-Tafilalet
39 Guercif 90,880 Oriental
40 Oulad Teima 89,387 Souss-Massa
41 Ben Guerir 88,626 Marrakesh-Safi
42 Tifelt 86,709 Rabat-Salé-Kénitra
43 Lqliaa 83,235 Souss-Massa
44 Taroudant 80,149 Souss-Massa
45 Sefrou 79,887 Fès-Meknès
46 Essaouira 77,966 Marrakesh-Safi
47 Fnideq 77,436 Tanger-Tetouan-Al Hoceima
48 Sidi Kacem 75,672 Rabat-Salé-Kénitra
49 Tiznit 74,699 Souss-Massa
50 Tan-Tan 73,209 Guelmim-Es Semara
51 Ouarzazate 71,067 Drâa-Tafilalet
52 Souk El Arbaa 69,265 Rabat-Salé-Kénitra
53 Youssoufia 67,628 Marrakesh-Safi
54 Lahraouyine 64,821 Casablanca-Settat
55 Martil 64,355 Tanger-Tetouan-Al Hoceima
56 Ain Harrouda 62,420 Casablanca-Settat
57 Suq as-Sabt Awlad an-Nama 60,076 Béni Mellal-Khénifra
58 Skhirat 59,775 Rabat-Salé-Kénitra
59 Ouazzane 59,606 Tanger-Tetouan-Al Hoceima
60 Benslimane 57,101 Casablanca-Settat
61 Al Hoceima 56,716 Tanger-Tetouan-Al Hoceima
62 Beni Ansar 56,582 Oriental
63 M'diq 56,227 Tanger-Tetouan-Al Hoceima
64 Sidi Bennour 55,815 Casablanca-Settat
65 Midelt 55,304 Drâa-Tafilalet
66 Azrou 54,350 Fès-Meknès
67 Drargua 50,946 Souss-Massa


Topics

New articles

This list was generated from these rules. Questions and feedback are always welcome! The search is being run daily with the most recent ~14 days of results. Note: Some articles may not be relevant to this project.

Rules | Match log | Results page (for watching) | Last updated: 2023-12-09 21:30 (UTC)

Note: The list display can now be customized by each user. See List display personalization for details.















Associated Wikimedia

The following Wikimedia Foundation sister projects provide more on this subject:

Sources

  1. ^ In the 2014 census, the High Commission for Planning gave the legal population of Casablanca as 3,359,818, which corresponds to the population of Casablanca Prefecture.
  2. ^ In the 2014 census, the High Commission for Planning gave the legal population of Fez as 1,112,072, which corresponds to the combined population of those parts of Fez Prefecture not within the cercle of Fez Banlieue ("suburbs").
  3. ^ In the 2014 census, the High Commission for Planning gave the legal population of Tangier as 947,952, which corresponds to the combined population of the four arrondissements of Bni Makada, Charf-Mghogha, Charf-Souani and Tanger-Médina.
  4. ^ In the 2014 census, the High Commission for Planning gave the legal population of Marrakesh as 928,850, which corresponds to the combined population of the municipality of Méchouar-Kasba and the five arrondissements of Annakhil, Gueliz, Marrakech-Médina, Ménara and Sidi Youssef Ben Ali.
  5. ^ In the 2014 census, the High Commission for Planning gave the legal population of Salé as 890,403, which corresponds to the combined population of the five arrondissements of Bab Lamrissa, Bettana, Hssaine, Layayda and Tabriquet.
  6. ^ In the 2014 census, the High Commission for Planning gave the legal population of Meknes as 632,079, which corresponds to the combined population of the municipalities of Meknes, Al Machouar – Stinia, Toulal and Ouislane.
  7. ^ In the 2014 census, the High Commission for Planning gave the legal population of Rabat as 577,827, which corresponds to the population of Rabat Prefecture.
  8. ^ The population figure refers only to the urban centre (HCP geographic code [fr] 09.001.05.09.3) of the rural commune of Drargua.
Discover Wikipedia using portals



This page was last updated at 2023-12-10 06:30 UTC. Update now. View original page.

All our content comes from Wikipedia and under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.


Top

If mathematical, chemical, physical and other formulas are not displayed correctly on this page, please useFirefox or Safari